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Boy meets girl

But will their love reach new heights? 

We consider it better to lie than to face condemnation

WELCOME to a whole new world – the Arabian city of Agrabah. It’s a place where the sunshine is hotter than hot and the golden sand dunes stretch for miles. But it’s also a mysterious city where powerful genies reside in magic lamps and carpets have been known to fly. Audiences can check out the magic for themselves at the Prince Edward Theatre in London, where Disney’s Aladdin is being staged.
Known as a ‘thieving street rat’, Aladdin is kept on his toes by the city’s guards. Ducking and diving round the marketplace to steal the odd loaf of bread, his focus is to keep one jump ahead of his enemies’ swords. He dreams of a new life; one where he isn’t broke.
On the other side of the city is the luxurious Sultan’s palace, where Princess Jasmine lives and is also longing for better days. Her father wants her to marry a prince, but the trouble is, she just doesn’t love any of them. In her quest for freedom, Jasmine disguises herself as a commoner and runs away from home. She meets Aladdin – and they
like each other.
When Jasmine’s true identity is revealed by guards, she is escorted back to the palace. Aladdin knows that he will never stand a chance of marrying her unless he is a prince. Enter the Genie – a largerthan- life friend who has the power to grant Aladdin three wishes. Suddenly, Aladdin’s desire to become a prince becomes reality. Going by the name Prince Ali, he woos Jasmine by taking her for a romantic flying-carpet ride on a beautiful starlit night.
But being a prince when you’re not isn’t as straightforward as it looks. Aladdin has to lie to Jasmine to cover his tracks. He feels guilty about it, but doesn’t know how to tell her that he’s really just a poor guy from the streets. Aladdin faces a dilemma: if he comes clean to Jasmine about his true identity, he risks her rejection. But if he marries her, he will be living a lie as Prince Ali for the rest of his life. What should he do?
Deciding whether or not to tell the truth is a problem which goes beyond make-believe stories. In real life, it can be tempting to lie about ourselves in order to make us sound better than we are. Sometimes we lie outright. Or we lie by hiding or disguising the truth. Or we make our deceptions simply by keeping our mouth shut. Perhaps we consider it better to lie than to face condemnation or rejection for the wrong things we have done.
But while many people might turn us away if they knew of our mistakes and failings, there is someone who promises to love and forgive us always – no matter what lies
we have lived.
In the Bible, Jesus told his followers: ‘I will never turn away anyone who comes to me’ (John 6:37 Good News Bible). When it comes to Jesus, we don’t have to pretend about who we are. We can come to him, honest about our flaws and burdens, and find acceptance. When we come clean, Jesus welcomes us. And when we say sorry for the lies we have lived or told, he offers us forgiveness and the chance to start afresh. This isn’t wishful thinking. It’s the gospel truth

War Cry 25 June 2016 

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