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Holmes truth

WHAT IS THE TRUTH ABOUT THE SLEUTH?

Sherlock’s temperament is more shaped by the fact that he is human

THE game is afoot. Sherlock is back for its fourth run on BBC One.
Since 1887, high-functioning sociopath Sherlock Holmes – created by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle – has been the subject of countless productions, films, stories and tourist attractions.
But this particular version, starring Benedict Cumberbatch, has made it big in a very modern way. The final episode of the third series generated 10,000 tweets a minute. Two years on, Sherlock and his companion Dr Watson are back at 221B Baker Street and the mysteries are closer to home.
John Watson (Martin Freeman) and his wife Mary (Amanda Abbington) celebrate the arrival of their baby daughter, Rosie. All seems happy. At their wedding some years earlier, Sherlock had pledged his protection for them.
Sherlock is readjusting to having to share John’s time and attention. But there is something about Mary. Mary has a dark past, which she has kept
from John. Although John doesn’t want to know the details, one of Mary’s former colleagues thinks she has betrayed her comrades and is out to kill her.
Sherlock and John track down the brains behind the operation and confront them. They, in turn, draw a gun on Holmes and fire. Mary leaps in front of Holmes and takes the bullet. She dies. Heartbroken, John blames Sherlock and wants nothing more to do with him. Sherlock blames himself and escapes to a narcotic fog. They seem doomed never to work together again.
Then, John learns that Sherlock’s life is in danger. Overcoming his hurt, John rushes to rescue his colleague from the clutches of a serial killer. The master detective and his blogger are no sooner reconciled than it is John who is looking down the barrel of a gun.
Will Sherlock be able rescue John in time? In this series, audiences are learning that Sherlock isn’t always a super hero. He is less elementary and more elemental. Benedict Cumberbatch says of his character: ‘I think Sherlock’s temperament is more shaped by the fact that he is human and trying to be superhuman … his real weakness is sometimes not seeing what’s right in front of him. He’s not unhuman, he is human and he is fallible.’
Aren’t we all. There are times when we feel as though we have got everything together, then something happens and we realise we haven’t.
As much as we want to feel capable of handling every situation that comes our way, in reality we can’t – we are only human.
For centuries, people all over the world have been plugging into a source greater than themselves. Faced with various problems and knowing his own limitations, early-day
Christian Paul drew strength from God. He confessed: ‘I am able to face anything through him who gives me strength’ (Philippians 4:13 Revised English Bible).
We don’t need to have it all together. When we feel burdened, we can hand the load over to God and trust him to give us the strength to get us through whatever we’re facing.
It can be hard to admit we need help. But God knows we’re human. That’s why he is ready to leap in when we call for his help. As tough as asking him might be, his willingness to help is no great mystery.

14 January 2017 The War Cry

 

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